Epigram 9.81

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μὴ εἴπῃς θάνατον βιοτῆς ὅρον εἰσὶ καμοῦσιν,
ὡς ζωοῖς, ἀρχαὶ συμφορέων ἕτεραι.
ἄθρει Νικίεω Κῴου μόρον ἤδη ἔκειτο
εἰν ἀίδῃ, νεκρὸς δ᾽ ἦλθεν ὑπ᾽ ἠέλιον

ἀστοὶ γὰρ τύμβοιο μετοχλίσσαντες ὀχῆας,
εἴρυσαν ἐς ποινὰς τλήμονα δυσθανέα.

— Paton edition

Tell me not that death is the end of life. The dead, like the living, have their own causes of suffering. Look at the fate of Nicias of Cos. He had gone to rest in Hades, and now his dead body has come again into the light of day. For his fellow-citizens, forcing the bolts of his tomb, dragged out the poor hard-dying wretch to punishment.

— Paton edition

Cities

Keywords

Poètes cités
Peuples, lieux

Scholia

Comments

#1

Nicias was the tyrant of Cos late in the first century B.C. We have coins with his head and numerous inscriptions in his honour.

#2

Grotius renders δυσθανέα as if it were δισθανέα, "twice dead," but the meaning of δυσθανέα is that they, so to speak, prolonged his agony as if he were still alive.

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